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©Copyright 2013, Chara Print • All rights reserved
Contact mwirz@whentheanimalsvanished.com

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©Copyright 2013, Chara Print • All rights reserved • Contact mwirz@whentheanimalsvanished.com

Mary Wirz

Various crayon-decorated shoe boxes lined with soft, colorful fabrics are buried in the back yard of Mary’s childhood home in Medford, Wisconsin. The shoe boxes are the final resting place for the family’s hamsters, guinea pigs, goldfish, parakeets, and countless wounded wild birds. Mary’s mother passed on her love for animals to her four children, and would merely sigh each time her daughter strolled through the back door with yet another homeless dog in tow.

Now at age 56, Mary lives in Wausau, Wisconsin, with her partner, Robert Lindow, and a feisty rescued Cockapoo named Bozy. Ten years as a long-haul truck driver, combined with owning a cotton diaper service and an interior design business, have brought her many varied life experiences. In 1987, her younger brother, Jimmy, died from AIDS, and the great loss to the family propelled Mary to seek a different direction in life; it gave her a yearning to understand why we exist, and a desire to hear the whisperings of the trees, the Earth, the animals, and of those we love who have left this life.

A word from Mary:  I am grateful for your interest in When the Animals Vanished, as I am passionate about the issues brought forth in the story—Earth, honeybees, and the precious, joyful animals. The delicate balance between man and nature provides us with food, shelter, and every single thing we take for granted to sustain our lives.

On a September morning of 2010, I stopped at a convenience store on my way to work, took two steps out of my car, and in one second this entire story dropped into my head, just as if someone downloaded it into my mind, and it consumed my every thought. Two weeks later I bought a used laptop, opened a new file, and without thinking, my fingers typed out When the Animals Vanished.

I do not have children, but my four wonderful nieces are very dear to me, and when my life ends I hope to leave them a world of beauty, hope, and harmony. We all feel this way about those we cherish—can we decide to direct the future using our inner wisdom instead of manipulation of the ecosystem? I have enduring faith that we can.